Goldfinch's Birdhouse

fletchingarrows:

paysagemauvais:

Crucifixion, detail [Crocifisso in un cimitero ebraico, dettaglio] - Giovanni Bellini 1501–1503  Oil on panel 81 x 49 cm The Albert Gallery, Prato

it’s the little details

fletchingarrows:

paysagemauvais:

Crucifixion, detail [Crocifisso in un cimitero ebraico, dettaglio] - Giovanni Bellini
1501–1503 
Oil on panel
81 x 49 cm
The Albert Gallery, Prato

it’s the little details

fissurina:

The Forgotten 1950s Girl Gang

No idea if this photo set is already here somewhere…it likely is…but this is a bit rad…
full article here: http://www.messynessychic.com/2013/02/10/the-forgotten-1950s-girl-gang/
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You might have heard of the Teddy Boys, a 1950s rebel youth subculture in Britain characterized by an unlikely style of dress inspired by Edwardian dandies fused with American rock’n roll. They formed gangs from East London to North Kensington and became high profile rebels in the media. But an important sub-subculture of the Teddy Boys, an unlikely female element, has remained all but invisible from historical records. Meet The Teddy Girls.

These are one of just a few known collections of documented photographs of the first British female youth culture ever to exist. In 1955, freelance photographer Ken Russell was introduced Josie Buchan, a Teddy Girl who introduced him to some of her friends. Russell photographed them and one other group in Notting Hill.

After his photographs were published in a small magazine in 1955, Russell’s photographs remained unseen for over half a century. He became a successful film director in the meantime. In 2005, his archive was rediscovered, and so were the Teddy Girls.

Russell remembers 14 year-old Teddy Girl, Jean Rayner: “She had attitude by the truckload. No one paid much attention to the teddy girls before I did them, though there was plenty on teddy boys. They were tough, these kids, they’d been born in the war years and food rationing only ended in about 1954 – a year before I took these pictures. They were proud. They knew their worth. They just wore what they wore.”

To understand the Teddy Girls style, we first have to go back to the boys culture. They emerged in England as post-war austerity was coming to an end and working class teenagers were able to afford good clothes and began to adopt the upper class Saville Row revival of dandy Edwardian fashion. By the mid 1950s, second-hand Edwardian suits were readily available on sale in markets as they had become unwearable by the upper-class once the Teddy Boys had started sporting them. The Teds, as they called themselves, wore long drape jackets, velvet collars, slim ties and began to pair the look with thick rubber-soled creeper shoes and the ‘greaser’ hairstyles of their American rock’n’roll idols.

Despite their overall gentlemanly style of dress (certainly compared to today), the Teddys were a teenage youth culture out to shock their parents’ generation, and quickly became associated with trouble by the media.

Teddy girls were mostly working class teens as well, but considered less interesting by the media who were more concerned with sensationalizing a violent working class youth culture. While Teddy boys were known for hanging around on street corners, looking for trouble, a young working class woman’s role at the time was still focused around the home.

But even with lower wages than the boys, Teddy girls would still dress up in their own drape jackets, rolled-up jeans, flat shoes, tailored jackets with velvet collars and put their feminine spin on the Teddy style with straw boater hats, brooches, espadrilles and elegant clutch bags. They would go to the cinema in groups and attend dances and concerts with the boys, collect rock’n’roll records and magazines. Together, they essentially cultivated the first market for teenage leisure in Britain.

In the end it was the troublesome reputation of the Teddy Boys that got the better of this youth subculture. Most of the violence and vandalism was exaggerated by the media, but there were notably a few gangs that chose a darker path.

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

italianartsociety:

Paolo Caliari, known as Veronese after his birthplace, died on this day in 1588 in Venice, where he spent the majority of his career. After training and early work in his native Verona, the artist moved to Venice in 1553, though he would continue to work for patrons throughout the Veneto. Alongside Titian and Tinoretto, Veronese dominated late Renaissance painting in the city on the lagoon, and was widely sought after for portraits, religious narratives, and mythologies. In addition to richly colored oil paintings, Veronese excelled in the medium of fresco like those painted for the Villa Barbaro at Maser. Veronese was famously brought before the inquisition for his on charges that his Last Supper, painted for the refectory of SS. Giovanni e Paolo in Venice, took too much artistic license with the biblical account. After his trial in July 1573, changed the title of his work to Feast in the House of Levi rather than change his composition to suit church officials.

Reference: Diana Gisolfi. “Veronese, Paolo.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press.<http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T089003>.

Deposition (or Lamentation), late 1540s, Verona, Italy, Museo di Castelvecchio; photo credit: Cameraphoto Arte, Venice/Art Resource, NY

Holy Family with St. Barbara and the Infant St. John, ca. 1565-70, oil on canvas, Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

Giustiniana Barbaro and the wetnurse with the dog standing at a balconyc. 1561, fresco, Villa Barbaro, Maser, Italy; photo credit: SCALA/Art Resource, NY

Last Supper, renamed the Feast in the House of Levi, oil on canvas, 1573, formerly SS. Giovanni e Paolo, Venice (now Galleria dell’Accademia); photo credit: Alinari/Art Resource, NY

Mars and Venus United by Love, c. 1570, oil on canvas, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Venus and Adonis, 1580-82,oil on canvas, Museo del Prado, Madrid

Portrait of Daniele Barbaro, 1561-65, oil on canvas, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

Portrait of a Young Man Wearing Lynx Fur, 1551-53, oil on canvas, Szépmûvészeti Múzeum, Budapest

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

thinkspace-gallery:

Close up view of a new painting in progress from Erik Jones ( @erikjonesart ) for ‘LAX / TXL’


Curated pop-up exhibit and mural project from Andrew Hosner of Thinkspace presented as a part of Project M/4 with Urban Nation


Opening Reception: 
Saturday, May 17th 8PM-Midnight

On view: May 17th – July 12th

Taking Place At:
Buelowstrasse 97
Berlin, Schoeneberg,
Germany

Additional details can be found at:http://thinkspacegallery.comwww.urban-nation.net

@urbannationberlin #urbannation #projectm4 #pm4 #thinkspacegallery #newcontemporary #urbancontemporary #art #museum #berlin #germany #laxtxl #wip #erikjones

thinkspace-gallery:

Close up view of a new painting in progress from Erik Jones ( @erikjonesart ) for ‘LAX / TXL’


Curated pop-up exhibit and mural project from Andrew Hosner of Thinkspace presented as a part of Project M/4 with Urban Nation


Opening Reception:
Saturday, May 17th 8PM-Midnight

On view: May 17th – July 12th

Taking Place At:
Buelowstrasse 97
Berlin, Schoeneberg,
Germany

Additional details can be found at:
http://thinkspacegallery.com
www.urban-nation.net

@urbannationberlin #urbannation #projectm4 #pm4 #thinkspacegallery #newcontemporary #urbancontemporary #art #museum #berlin #germany #laxtxl #wip #erikjones

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Peter Gut

Peter Gut is a Swiss typographer, illustrator and caricaturist based in Winterthur. 

He has collaborated for years with the weekly magazine Facts, and today works for Weltwoche,
the Neue Zürcher Zeitung and the business magazine Bilanz. Gut also designs book covers and
 has illustrated the children’s book Der Bär auf dem Försterball.